History

Detroit, the oldest city in the Midwest, was founded in 1701. Named according to its location at the Detroit River it was called the “City of the Strait” (Ville d’Etroit) by the French trader and explorer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac.

Secured from Fort Ponchartrain, the area stayed under French control until 1760 when the British occupied it, built Fort Lernoult and made it their central command of power on the western frontier. With the end of the Revolutionary War in 1783, Detroit was placed by treaty in the territory of the United States, but continued to be in the possession of the British until July 11, 1796, when Capt. Moses Porter officially accepted the transfer and the United States took control of the territory as the final act of the Treaty of Paris.

Detroit’s incorporation as a city of the United States took place in 1815. After vigorous growth for a century it became the birth place of America’s automobile industry in 1896 and is known today just as well as the Motor City and Motown.

During the late 1990s and into the beginning of the 21st century, Detroit began a slow slide into poverty, with crime rising significantly. In 2013, only a year after the Awakening, Detroit officially declared bankruptcy.

In the years that followed, amid the chaos of the Awakening and the various crashes, the companies that were to come together to form Ares Macrotechnology were quietly buying up sections of Detroit. This was long before the advent of corporate extraterritoriality and the other pro-corporate laws, or even the formation of the UCAS.

Since that time, Ares and its various divisions have had a near stranglehold on the city of Detroit. However, it has not been all bad news. Ares has invested billions in the city, and the formation of Knight Errant and its basing in the city has contributed significantly to the city becoming a good place to live.

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History

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